DIRECTIONS: Use the attachments. When complete there should be a thesis statement and an annotated bibliography. 1. Identify at least one encyclopedia, or similar work,

DIRECTIONS: Use the attachments.  When complete there should be a thesis statement and an annotated bibliography. 1.      Identify at least one encyclopedia, or similar work, providing a big picture overview of key issues your topic needs to address. 2.      Identify at least one secondary source, an interpretive work, addressing your topic which was written by someone other than the philosophers identified in your topic.  This secondary source should be located through the journal article database available in the APUS Online Library, where contemporary philosophical articles pertaining to your topic, can be located.   For instance, use EBSCO’s Academic Search Elite.  This is a searchable database of scholarly articles from many academic disciplines, including philosophy.  It should be used to locate contemporary scholarly articles pertaining to epistemology, perception, Locke, etc.  It also contains the full text of many of the articles. 3.      Identify at least one primary source, from a major philosopher identified in your topic choice. Be sure that the primary source selected pertains to the issues raised by your topic. Provide a complete reference in MLA style for each work selected, and explain briefly (annotate) how the content of each source will assist you with your Philosophical Essay Assignment..  Attach as a correctly formatted MS Word document and submit. Use the following cites listed below as references AND the uplaoded material as well. Some cites require a password to access so to avoid that, I uplaoded the material.  Be sure to use MLA format when citing them: http://web.a.ebscohost.com.ezproxy2.apus.edu/ehost/detail/detail?vid=0&sid=ea508403-a28f-4e24-aed3-ee4786ccbd6e%40sessionmgr4006&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRl#db=nlebk&AN=149829

ATTACHED Prior to beginning work on this week’s journal, read the Case 15: Borderline Personality Disorder in Gorenstein and Comer (2014), and Borderline Personality Disorder

ATTACHED Prior to beginning work on this week’s journal, read the Case 15: Borderline Personality Disorder in Gorenstein and Comer (2014), and Borderline Personality Disorder in Sneed et al., . (2012). also read the Rizvi, et al. (2013), “An Overview of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Professional Psychologists,” Harned, et al.  (2013), “Treatment Preference Among Suicidal and Self-Injuring Women with Borderline Personality Disorder and PTSD,” Miller (2006), “Telehealth Issues in Consulting Psychology Practice,”  and Luxton, et al. (2011), “mHealth for Mental Health: Integrating Smartphone Technology in Behavioral Healthcare” articles. Assess the evidence-based practices implemented in this case study. In your paper, include the following. Purchase the answer to view it

After supporters of President Trump , hoping to stop the counting of electoral college votes, lawmakers and experts alike repeated a phrase to describe the

After supporters of President Trump , hoping to stop the counting of electoral college votes, lawmakers and experts alike repeated a phrase to describe the violent mob: “domestic terrorists.” “Those who performed these reprehensible acts cannot be called protesters; no, these were rioters and insurrectionists, goons and thugs, domestic terrorists,” Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said in a speech after lawmakers reconvened. “They do not represent America.” Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) said Thursday that the band of people who occupied the House floor were “terrorists, not patriots,” evoking the fact that September will mark 20 years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Also, a number of national security experts agree with that assessment, comparing the aggressive takeover of the federal landmark to the FBI’s definition of domestic terrorism: “Violent, criminal acts committed by individuals and/or groups to further ideological goals stemming from domestic influences, such as those of a political, religious, social, racial, or environmental nature.” I like to take your stance on this for this very first prompt. Can we easily and neatly categorize this incident as an act of terror? Is it easy to categorize any act of violence as an act of terror? Make sure you follow the guidelines I posted in an earlier announcement Your response which represents a synthesis of your opinion and the insights from the source you found will be around 350-500 words in length. Note: Your response will have to be informed by a second short article that you will find and read on your own. You have to pick a second source from a list of open-sources journals provided below.

For this assignment you will be given a case study about a young lady named Sarah Smith. Review the information provided and answer the questions

For this assignment you will be given a case study about a young lady named Sarah Smith. Review the information provided and answer the questions following. Be sure to cite your references. Look at Sarah as if she is a patient in your office seeking care. What are your immediate concerns? What needs to be done for her? Be thorough and succinct in your responses. Sarah Smith is a 28 y/o African American female who presents to the office with c/o wound to her left foot for the past few days. States she had tripped and fell while barefoot scraping the top of her foot on the pavement. She denies any other injury from the incident. Over the past 24 hours the wound has had “smelly” drainage. Has been experiencing generalized achiness, but denies fever and chills. Did not seek medical attention at the time of injury. Has been using hydrogen peroxide to clean her wound. Is unclear of her last tetanus vaccination. Patient PMHx significant for DM II. States that she takes her medications when she remembers, and does not always check her blood sugar. Asthma: no hospitalizations for exacerbation. DM II Denies Former tobacco user: ceased smoking 2 years ago. Had smoked 1ppd x 5 years ETOH: socially Illicit drugs: denies Significant for paternal DM, otherwise unremarkable Metformin: 500mg BID po – did not take the last few days Albuterol MDI: 2 puffs every 6 hours prn – last use just PTA Singulair: 10mg po daily Trinessa: 1 tab po daily – last taken this am PCN: hives 2 weeks ago. G0p0 General: denies any weight changes, fatigue or fever; + body aches Skin: denies any rashes; + wound to left foot HEENT: denies headache, head injury, dizziness, lightheadedness; Denies any vision changes Denies any hearing changes, tinnitus, vertigo, earache Denies any nasal congestion, discharge, nose bleeds or sinus tenderness Denies any sore throat, difficulty swallowing Neck: denies any swollen glands, pain Breasts: denies any pain, discharge Respiratory: denies any dyspnea; positive cough and wheezing CV: denies any chest pain, edema GI: denies any nausea/vomiting/diarrhea/constipation; denies bloody stools PV: denies claudication, swelling to LE GU: denies frequency, urgency, burning; Denies vaginal discharge, itching, sores Denies penile discharge, itching or sores MS: positive pain to left foot Psych: denies nervousness, depression Neuro: denies Headache, dizziness, vertigo, syncope, weakness; + numbness to right LE Heme: denies any easy bruising Vital signs: 100.5 (tympanic), 162/88, 118, 22, O2 sat 95% on RA Height: 5’5”     Weight: 250 lbs. Blood glucose: 230 (Fasting; states has not eaten yet today) patient awake, alert, oriented x 4 in NAD Skin: warm, dry, color WNL. 4 cm lesion noted to anterior left foot with crusting and purulent drng; + surrounding erythema extending up 7 cm proximally HEENT: head nontraumatic, normocephalic Pupils PERRLA, EOMs intact; disc margins sharp, without hemorrhages, exudates; no AV nicking noted Ears: bilateral TM with good cone of light and intact Nose: mucosa pink, septum midline; no sinus tenderness appreciated Mouth: mucosa pink, moist; tongue midline; tonsils 1+ without exudate Neck: supple; trachea midline; no LAD Resp: regular and unlabored; lungs with end expiratory wheezing throughout CV: RRR, S1 and S2 noted; no s3, s4 or murmur appreciated Abdomen: soft, non-distended; Bs + x 4; no tenderness with palpation; no CVA tenderness with percussion Genitalia: deferred Rectal: deferred Extremities: warm and without edema; calves supple, non-tender PV: no LE edema MS: + swelling to left foot; + tenderness of 2-4th left metatarsals; + left pedal pulse; CMS intact; Cap refill < 2 sec. Neuro: alert, cooperative; thought coherent; oriented x 4; cranial nerves II-XII intact 1. List your differentials for her current problems. Remember you should have at least three different differentials for each problem. Include rationale for each differential. 2. At this time what medical diagnoses are you most concerned about? Do they impact other diagnoses? If so, how? 3. What diagnostic images would you order? Provide your rationale. What are you trying to rule in or out? 4. What laboratory work would you order? What would you anticipate to be abnormal? Provide your rationale for each. 5. What is your comprehensive plan of care? Include your rationales. Before finalizing your work, you should: Your writing Assignment should:

The full text may take 40-60 seconds to translate; larger documents may take longer. For one thing, most of the cost of a typical packaged

The full text may take 40-60 seconds to translate; larger documents may take longer. For one thing, most of the cost of a typical packaged good is tied up in packaging, transportation and other aspects of production–not in the product itself. […]lowering the quantity is unlikely to preserve a company’s margins. For one thing, most of the cost of a typical packaged good is tied up in packaging, transportation and other aspects of production–not in the product itself. […]lowering the quantity is unlikely to preserve a company’s margins. You have requested “on-the-fly” machine translation of selected content from our databases. This functionality is provided solely for your convenience and is in no way intended to replace human translation. Neither ProQuest nor its licensors make any representations or warranties with respect to the translations. The translations are automatically generated “AS IS” and “AS AVAILABLE” and are not retained in our systems. PROQUEST AND ITS LICENSORS SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ANY AND ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY WARRANTIES FOR AVAILABILITY, ACCURACY, TIMELINESS, COMPLETENESS, NON-INFRINGMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Your use of the translations is subject to all use restrictions contained in your Electronic Products License Agreement and by using the translation functionality you agree to forgo any and all claims against ProQuest or its licensors for your use of the translation functionality and any output derived there from. Translations powered by LEC. Translations powered by LEC. The full text may take 40-60 seconds to translate; larger documents may take longer. How do you get customers to pay more for your products? It’s a question no company wants to face. Raise prices in the middle of a sluggish economy, and they risk alienating customers they can’t afford to lose and leave themselves vulnerable to competitors. Yet they have little choice but to ratchet up. The cost of making consumer goods and getting them to stores has been rising for some time. And a lot of the old strategies for shaving overhead, such as outsourcing, are getting less effective in economic terms and more unpopular in humanitarian terms. Passing along costs while keeping customers happy is a tough balancing act–but it can be done. Companies should resist the urge to cut promotions or camouflage price increases, which often backfire. Instead, they should focus on minimizing the pain for shoppers who are the most sensitive to price increase, by targeting discounts at them and offering different versions of their product at different price levels. Here’s a look at some things companies shouldn’t do–but often do anyway–along with some smarter alternatives for raising prices. On the surface, it seems like a good idea. A higher price tag is obvious as soon as somebody picks up a product in a store. So, why not keep the price the same, and make a move that may not be noticed at all: pull back on coupons, special offers and other deals? The trouble is, customers do pay attention. Our research shows that shoppers put much more weight on coupons, markdowns and other offers than even sophisticated companies realize. In the early ’90s, Procter & Gamble Co. cut promotions and coupons significantly. Our research showed this experiment misfired, and after a few years of share losses, the company restored promotions. More recently, there’s J.C. Penney Co.’s failed strategy of cutting back on the frequency of sales; the company lost nearly $1 billion in 2012. (P&G and J.C. Penney declined to comment.) No, people often don’t know the exact price they paid for something. But they have a very strong perception of whether something is a good value. And they base this judgment on how often a brand or store offers markdowns, promotions and coupons. Promotions also let companies hold on to customers who are on tight budgets and need the deals the most. Let’s say a food maker raises the price on a cereal but offers a coupon at the same time. Only people who are watching their pennies will take the trouble to clip the coupon and redeem it, while many others will simply pay the higher price. So, the company is raising the average price consumers pay for their product–without driving away customers who might otherwise seek out a cheaper brand. Along those lines, there’s also an important psychological component to promotions. It takes a lot of work for people to clip coupons and mail in proofs of purchase. The effort involved makes deal-prone consumers feel like smart shoppers–and smart shoppers are happy shoppers. Sometimes companies try to cut costs by lowering the quality of their main product line. Or they keep quality high for their main brand and introduce a lower-price, lower-quality extension–called a fighter brand–to satisfy shoppers on the tightest budgets. Think Bounty Basic and Charmin Basic, which were rolled out a few years ago. Or, for a bit of ancient history, recall Kodak Funtime film. But the move is likely to backfire. People may just buy the cheap brand instead, so sales of the regular brand will end up suffering. Or the company may not make it clear that the fighter brand is a budget offering that doesn’t have the same quality as the main brand. People may buy it, be disappointed and turn away from the whole product line. Another move that usually backfires: cutting how much product people get in a similar-looking package while charging them the old price. A bottle of soda might shrink by a couple of ounces, or you might get four fewer cookies in a pack–so the price tag doesn’t go up, but the price per unit goes up. Why doesn’t this approach work? For one thing, most of the cost of a typical packaged good is tied up in packaging, transportation and other aspects of production–not in the product itself. As a result, lowering the quantity is unlikely to preserve a company’s margins. Plus, when consumers discover that, say, the chocolate bar they just bought is smaller but the price is the same, the backlash can be costly and visible. People who feel that they’re being cheated or tricked can be very angry customers–and these days, social media give them an easy way to publicly voice their anger. Less can be more, but only if companies can position small packs as a virtue and charge a premium for them. Think 100-calorie Oreos or Marlboro Shorts, for instance. So, what’s a more effective way to raise prices? Start off with basic considerations. First off, unless you’re an airline, you can’t raise prices every day. So, when companies do make the move, they should cover not only the higher costs that they’ve incurred up to that point, but also costs they anticipate down the road. Companies should also spell out, as much as possible, what’s behind the increase. They should tell customers why the price is going up, whether it’s higher costs for ingredients or soaring transportation costs. Research shows that consumers respond not just to the price level but to how fair they think it is. If they think that a price increase is tied to profit-taking or to other hidden motives, they’ll consider it unfair. They are more likely to accept the increase if it’s tied to higher costs, such as a fuel-price surcharge. It’s also important to consider which products get a price increase. Think about this: If a food company has vegetables and ice cream in its stable of products, which one should get a price increase? The ice cream. Everyone, even people who are financially strapped, needs staples, so it’s important not to price them out of reach. On the other hand, indulgences like ice cream, cookies and cosmetics are discretionary purchases, so people tend to be less price-sensitive when they buy them. Another important consideration: timing. It’s better to raise prices when introducing a new product, for instance. New products are usually improvements, and new features can justify new prices. Timing also involves keeping a close eye on the competition. Price increases can turn into a standoff–with nobody wanting to make the first move, even if all of the companies in a market are facing the same cost pressures. Rather than wait to see who blinks first, the market leader should lead at the appropriate time and give rivals a chance to raise their own prices and follow along. Likewise, companies that don’t dominate the market should follow the market leader quickly, unless they’re not facing the same cost increases as the leader or if they’re prepared to see their profit margins shrink for strategic reasons. It’s going to be their best chance to raise their prices and cover their costs. After raising prices, companies should rely on discounting to keep their coupon-clipping customers–the ones most likely to jump ship if they think they’re getting a bad deal. That means taking a close look at who their customers are and who should get what promotions. Think about the coupons that are printed on your receipt at the checkout line and how they’re tailored to what you just bought and what you’ve bought before. There are a number of ways to tackle the job of targeting deals. Companies can start online communities to take the pulse of their customer base and work with stores to get access to the data they collect at checkout. They can drill down pretty far into that information, targeting unique deals to individual shoppers, but that can get expensive and isn’t even necessary. It’s enough to group customers into segments based on things like their purchase history and how sensitive they are to price. When evaluating the success of these plans, though, companies should be sure that they look at the right metrics. They should remember the bigger point of offering promotions: holding on to their most price-sensitive consumers by allowing them to use the discount, while letting others pay full price so that the average price paid for products goes up. Percentage of sales with a discount and coupon redemption rates do not measure success. Customer retention, incremental sales, and incremental profit are much better measures, even if tougher to assess. Instead of coming up with low-quality fighter brands, companies should “unbundle” the features of their products and let customers pay for the extras they want. For instance, companies might take their core product, remove the bells and whistles and lower the price. Call that the “good” version. Then they might add a pricier “better” version that has extras and a “best” option fully loaded with features at an even higher price. Consider Apple’s iPad Mini, which ranges in price from $329 to more than $659, depending on how much connectivity and memory people want. The $329 iPad Mini isn’t low quality by any means–it works fine for people who just want a machine for browsing and don’t need to save a lot of files. This strategy works in a couple of ways. First, a bare-bones “good” version becomes a competitive option for price-sensitive consumers who might otherwise choose a cheap product from a rival. Let’s say that a shopper is prepared to spend $250 or so on a Kindle Fire. If there’s a $329 iPad out there, it isn’t hard to convince them to make the switch. Likewise, people who were interested in a company’s product in the first place may trade up to a more expensive version because of context effects–which basically means changing your preference based on what else is on the shelf. If somebody is planning to buy an iPad Mini and the only choices are a $329 and a $659 model, they are less likely to leap to the higher price. But, if there is an intermediate “better” option at $459, it looks like a reasonable compromise. Companies should be sure that “better” products have attractive margins, though, since an array of good, better and best products favors the compromise option in the middle. Finally, it’s important for companies to make their products seem more valuable, so price increases will go down easier with shoppers. Consumers form ideas about what a company usually charges and what the product is worth compared with competitors–a concept called the reference price. They judge the value of a product based on the difference between what is being charged and the reference price in their head. One way to boost that reference price: put together packages of goods. Let’s say a company makes skin-care and beauty products. It can put a bunch of those items into the same box, call it a “home spa package” and sell it at a premium. The idea is to get customers to compare the price to a day at a spa–the reference price for the product goes up, in comparison to which the package is a much better deal. Likewise, companies might package a number of foods together into a complete family meal that supermarkets can sell in their deli section. Encouraging customers to compare the price to dinner at a restaurant or takeout raises their reference price–and therefore raises the perceived value of the packaged meal. Dr. Ailawadi is the Charles Jordan 1911 TU’12 professor of marketing at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business. Dr. Farris is the Landmark Communications professor of business administration at the Darden School of Business, University of Virginia. They can be reached at Credit: Kusum L. Ailawadi You have requested “on-the-fly” machine translation of selected content from our databases. This functionality is provided solely for your convenience and is in no way intended to replace human translation. Neither ProQuest nor its licensors make any representations or warranties with respect to the translations. The translations are automatically generated “AS IS” and “AS AVAILABLE” and are not retained in our systems. PROQUEST AND ITS LICENSORS SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ANY AND ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY WARRANTIES FOR AVAILABILITY, ACCURACY, TIMELINESS, COMPLETENESS, NON-INFRINGMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Your use of the translations is subject to all use restrictions contained in your Electronic Products License Agreement and by using the translation functionality you agree to forgo any and all claims against ProQuest or its licensors for your use of the translation functionality and any output derived there from. Translations powered by LEC. Translations powered by LEC. (c) 2013 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. Reproduced with permission of copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Purchase the answer to view it Purchase the answer to view it

Use the Internet to research Verizon Communications’ financial statements, annual report, notes to the financial statements, president’s letter, and management discussion and analysis from the

Use the Internet to research Verizon Communications’ financial statements, annual report, notes to the financial statements, president’s letter, and management discussion and analysis from the most recent year in order to complete this assignment. Write a five to six (5-6) page paper in which you: 1.Discuss the disclosure requirement on accounting policies, and identify at least two (2) examples of the most commonly required disclosure. Explain the key ways in which the examples you provided are useful to financial statement users. Analyze Verizon Communications’ disclosure on accounting policies, and give your opinion on whether or not the information is ful for decision making. Provide a rationale for your response. 2.Explain the importance of the management discussion and analysis section of an annual report. Select three (3) items from Verizon’s management and discussion analysis of the annual report that could be useful to potential investors. Provide three (3) specific examples of how the three (3) items you selected could influence a potential investor’s decision to invest in Verizon. 3.Describe segmented information, and explain the way in which companies determine segments. Identify at least three (3) advantages and three (3) disadvantages of segmented financial data. Give your opinion on whether or not the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. Outline the manner in which Verizon segments its financial data. Suggest key actions that Verizon’s management can take in order to improve the company’s segmented financial data. Provide a rationale for your response. 4.Analyze the various types of auditor’s reports, and determine the impact that the auditor’s report has on a company’s ability to obtain financing from a bank. Identify the type of auditor’s report issued on Verizon, and speculate the manner in which you believe banks will perceive Verizon’s auditor’s report. 5.Use at least two (2) quality academic resources in this assignment. Note: Wikipedia and other Websites do not qualify as academic resources. Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements: •Be typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; citations and references must follow APA or school-specific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions. •Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, the student’s name, the professor’s name, the course title, and the date. The cover page and the reference page are not included in the required assignment page length.

Specific Instructions for this assignment can be found in the attached document. The grading rubric is listed below. IMPORTANT: A Turnitin Originality Report will be

Specific Instructions for this assignment can be found in the attached document. The grading rubric is listed below. IMPORTANT: A Turnitin Originality Report will be generated for this assignment. Your originality report must show a score of 15% or less excluding the bibliography and quotes in the amount permitted by the assignment instructions.  Any report with an Originality Report between 20 and 29% will be scored with a significant point reduction. Any paper receiving an Originality Score of 30% or greater will be scored with a grade of 0 with no opportunity to resubmit. Additional information on Turnitin can be found in the Student Services section of the APUS Library. . Grading Rubric for this Assignment

For our final thread that you explored in the Consider your audience—who are you writing for and what are you wanting them to learn? Instructions:

For our final thread that you explored in the Consider your audience—who are you writing for and what are you wanting them to learn? Instructions: Last week you reviewed the financial concepts you learned in this course and decided on a topic that is interesting to you. Now you’re going to have the opportunity to write a blog post on a topic that interests you. Remember that this topic must be relevant to the material that we’ve learned in the course and should include you’ve learned in the course. Here are a few guidelines while writing your blog post:

First of all you need to downlod SQL 2012 the abloud the data to solve Module 9 assighnment , ther is in class qury can

First of all you need to downlod SQL 2012 the abloud the data to solve Module 9 assighnment , ther is in class qury can you as well. For this assignment you will use the PR database. Download the PR.zip folder from the Module, extract the database from the folder and attach it to the server. The PR database is a “raw data” payroll database comprised of 6 tables with the following fields and schema: The function of each table is as follows: Benefits: this table contains insurance plan information and costs EmpData: this table contains employee information including whether they have a spouse (bit datatype- 1 equals yes), how many children (dependents) and the employees withholding allowance for payroll tax purposes. Work: this table contains current payrate information including start and end dates for the payrate, and whether the raise was for cost of living (COLA- bit data type). Department: this table contains information for the different departments an employee is assigned. Hours: this table contains payperiod hours worked including ancillary pay (vacation, holiday, sick, etc.) PayPeriod: this table contains individual payperiod information. This is a typical layout for a payroll database- information regarding gross pay, net pay, tax withholding, insurance costs, etc. will be generated by creating and using views. I highly suggest first setting up each view as a SELECT statement (sans the CREATE VIEW AS statement) and check the result sets against your SELECT for accuracy. After successfully creating the views in this assignment, do not delete them as they will be used again in upcoming assignments.

A literature review is a synthesized research report on a specific topic, in your case it would be your area of focus. Synthesized is not

A literature review is a synthesized research report on a specific topic, in your case it would be your area of focus. Synthesized is not summary, it means you are reading and discussing diverse aspects of your study. You begin with an introduction of your subject and then subheadings on the same subject. So we are discussing   ””Decreasing escape maintain behaviors during paper-based homework in students diagnosed with ASD at elementary level.””     (history, who is mainly impacted, percentage of population, what effects and social issues exist due to this, then you move on to subheadings – main theoretical frameworks, theorists, studies, interventions, what has worked, what hasn’t worked, implications for the future, conclusion).  Remember, you are not summarizing but synthesizing – that is reading and discussing it in third person objective in an intelligent and scholarly way. The literature review is a part of the final focus paper but what you have to submit this week is a summarized literature review consisting of at least 10 sources that you have identified to you justify and provide a framework for your concept paper and action research. I have attached here some document that as an example of what i need, . note the APA formatting, the reference page, abstract, etc. I have attached the guidelines for the literature below, as well as other resources for you. If you have any questions, let me know.